What does an online TEFL course involve?

What does an online TEFL course involve? Well, it depends on the course, but in this post I’ll focus on what ESLinsider’s advanced course involves.

The advanced course is “advanced” as according to research it uses the best methods to learn online. Some of these methods include the use of instructional videos and other visuals, feedback, writing, bite-sized learning, repetition, audio, etc.

Course syllabus

Here is a look at some of the topics in the advanced course.

  • Introduction (30 teachers share their experiences on video in Asia)
  • “Engrish” entrance exam (let’s make sure you speak English and not “Engrish”)
  • Teaching methods (7 different methods of teaching explored)
  • The teacher as a public speaker (How to captivate your students)
  • Learning styles (the old concept of learning styles & what to take from it)
  • Lesson planning (Learn 2 different preparation methods)
  • Presenting language (Learn how to introduce language to your students)
  • Teaching reading
  • Teaching speaking
  • Teaching writing
  • Teaching listening
  • Teaching pronunciation & phonics (Learn pronunciation tips for kids-adults)
  • Midterm
  • Grammar
  • Using games & activities (for enhanced learning & engagement)
  • Teaching with songs (How to use music to teach)
  • Dealing with problems in the classroom (Solutions to common problems)
  • Classroom management (How to handle the most difficult students)
  • Classroom management tips
  • Writing your resume (How to outshine the competition even without experience)
  • Finding jobs (Where to look, how to avoid scams and crappy employers)
  • Culture shock
  • Final exam
  • TEFL certification

Inside each level or topic you will find a variety of content that includes video, text, images and audio followed by questions and occasional assignments.

To proceed to the next level you need to maintain a grade of 80% or higher.

Entrance exam

This quiz is pretty short and easy if you are a native speaker. I also tried to make the course as entertaining as possible. Learning should be fun or interesting because if it’s not then you wont learn!

The same can be said for your future students.

Lesson planning assignments

This course uses images from common student books. You will be most likely using books that are similar to this when you get abroad. This course includes 4 lesson planning assignments with feedback so you can correct any errors that you may make.

Here’s one assignment focused on teaching vocabulary. Before you do the assignment you will receive instruction on how to do so. The feedback adds a little reinforcement.

Small chunks of reading

If you looked at the research above you will see that many people don’t actually read much online. So unlike some other courses that may be entirely text or require reading large amounts of text before taking quizzes, ESLinsider delivers content in small bits as to not overwhelm you.

And frequently there are instructional videos which make learning more enjoyable, faster and easier.

The videos are then followed by questions such as true or false or multiple choice. And if needed you can go back to the video and watch it again.

A review of ESLinsider

Or search:

“ESLinsider’s online TEFL course”

When Is The Best Time To Take An Online TEFL Course?

When is the best time to take an online TEFL course? This is a question that I don’t actually see people ask often or consider. Most people take courses whether they are online or onsite BEFORE they start.

But is this actually the best time?

Well, it improves your resume as it gives you a qualification, but as far as the training goes I don’t think it is for a couple of reasons.

The first reason why is because you haven’t started teaching yet and you have nothing to work with or compare it to. At this point teaching is still an abstract concept.

The second reason why is that there’s going to be a gap in between the time when you complete the course and when you start your job. So that is not going to help your memory of the course material.

If the online TEFL course wasn’t any good then that’s also not going to help your memory.

On average it will probably be at least a couple of months in between when you finish the course and start working.

How long do courses allow access to the courses?

Well, it depends on the course. Most online courses allow less than 6 months. Here are a couple of examples.

So when is the best time to take an online TEFL course?

Now contrary to popular belief which is you take a course before you start teaching I would say that if you are going to take a course just one time then I would take it after you start.

Why?

Because you will have context. The material will seem less abstract to you. It will probably be more helpful too because you will remember more of it.

But don’t I need the certification to get a job?

You can get a job with an online TEFL certificate, but you can also get a job without any TEFL course.

But won’t my job be difficult if I don’t know what to do on the first day?

Sure, but I think it’s going to be a bit difficult either way. Ideally you should take a course before you start and then after again for review. Research shows that repetition and spaced intervals between studying leads to better memory and retention.

I don’t think your first week or so will be that easy regardless so yes, taking it before should help, but I think it will be much more helpful if you start after you start your job for the reasons mentioned above.

So now you know more about the best time. But what is the best online TEFL course?

Is an online TEFL course enough? What do you mean by enough?

Is an online TEFL course enough? What do you mean by enough? Do you mean can you get a job with an online TEFL? Or do you mean is it good enough for the training?

In my experience teaching in Asia: China, Korea, and Taiwan I would say that most schools there will accept online TEFL courses, however it does depend on the school.

The schools that don’t accept online courses are often more prestigious or in places like Europe or the middle east. Most first time teachers do not get into these schools anyways unless they have experience.

So despite what you might have heard having an in-class course is not going to make a big or any difference in your chances of getting a job or making more money. Having TEFL experience matters more.

The course is just a start.

Are online TEFL courses any good? Well, that is going to depend on the course as all online courses are not created equally. What you take away from a course or what you learn is going to depend on the course and you.

Is an online TEFL course for you?

  • Are you a self-directed learner?
  • Are you self disciplined?
  • Are you independent or introverted?
  • Do you want to control the pace?
  • Are you planning to teach abroad for just 1-2 years?

If your answers are mostly yes to those questions then an online TEFL course may be better for you compared to an onsite TEFL course.

Now let’s talk about the training.

Here’s why most online TEFL courses are not good enough

How do online TEFL courses work? Well, it depends on the course, but for a lower quality one you read passages and then take quizzes or answer multiple choice questions. Now you can learn by reading, but if you have no visual element to it you’re going to have an awfully hard time remembering what you are studying.

Studies show that people tend to only read 20-28% of a page. So if you only read that much then how much do you think you will remember?

If you don’t remember what you studied in a course then how well do you think you will teach?

You need a visual to learn how to teach. For me the best way to learn how to teach was by watching other teachers. Now you can do that in a classroom or you can do it online with video.

A higher quality course is going to use a lot of instructional videos because studies show that people learn better with video compared to text.

It’s also more interesting.

You may have read that online courses are useless or worthless, but the people who say those things typically fall into a few groups:

  • Traditional learners
  • CELTA snobs
  • They took a cheap/low quality Groupon TEFL course
  • They never took an online course and are just repeating what others say

If you read r/tefl on Reddit you will soon find out that many people there are pro-CELTA. CELTA is supposed to be a good course, but it’s not for everyone especially those who are not in it for the long run, don’t teach adults, don’t want to cram, or pay $2000.

On the other end of the spectrum on Reddit are those that recommend taking the cheapest online TEFL you can get so you can “check the box”.

These people are only focused on appearances and getting the job, but getting a job is just the beginning.

A cheap course is cheap for a reason. You tend to get what you pay for. As mentioned above you probably won’t get instructional videos, feedback or a quality course.

Going with a low quality/cheap course will likely continue the circle of people saying online courses are worthless. So yeah they are worthless if you take the wrong course just to get a job (“check the box”) and you don’t learn.

I think the biggest factor for a successful experience with an online course is to have a visual. You should watch other teachers teach the same or similar students as you are going to teach. If you teach kids then you need to watch other teachers teach kids.

If you teach adults then some stuff will transfer to kids, but not all and vice versa.

Here is an advanced course that is especially focused on teaching kids (5-14) in Asia.


Kristina's review of ESLinsider

More reviews on ESLinsider and here.

Art shows

This is a resume of my art shows. It needs an update^^. It’s a little dated, but I wanted to put it somewhere before it vanishes.

I worked as an artist creating various pieces and projects for display in gallery exhibitions, juried exhibitions, magazine and newspaper publications.

You can see some of my art work here.

Solo Exhibitions

  • April 2001: “Exposure of Process”, Box Gallery, Sante Fe, NM
  • December 1998: Old Main Art Museum, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ.

Group Exhibitions

  • March 2004: Catamount Arts, St. Johnsbury, VT
  • January 2001: Plan B Evolving Arts, Sante Fe, NM
  • September 2000: Art One Gallery, Scottsdale, AZ.
  • June 2000: Art One Gallery, Scottsdale, AZ.
  • August 1999: Patricia Cameron Gallery, Seattle, WA.
  • July 1999: Lead Gallery, Seattle, WA.
  • December 1998: Art One Gallery, Scottsdale, AZ.
  • August 1998: Art One Gallery, Scottsdale, AZ.
  • June 1998: Art One Gallery, Scottsdale, AZ.

Juried Exhibitions:

  • April 2005: Stock 20 Gallery, Taichung, Taiwan, R.O.C
  • March 1998: 1st place award, Beasley Gallery, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ.

Publications

  • March 2001: “The Reporter”, Sante Fe, NM
  • April 2001: “The Reporter”, Sante Fe, NM
  • April 2001: “THE”, Sante Fe, NM

Magazine

  • June 2003: “Direct Art”, volume 8, New York, NY

Why doesn’t ESLinsider have any 3rd party reviews?

Are you searching for reviews of ESLinsider’s courses? Wondering why there aren’t any on many other sites? Or maybe you saw the reviews on ESLinsider and are wondering if they are fake or if there are any bad reviews of ESLinsider?

Not Well-Known, Yet Has Invaluable Information and…” Kyle

Towards the end of this article I’ll talk about the “bad reviews”, but for now I’ll talk about why there aren’t any reviews on 3rd party sites.

But wait a second.

Actually there are on ESLinsider’s Youtube channel.

I’d like to point out that unlike many other courses ESLinsider actually has a lot of “reviews” if you want to call them that on its videos on Youtube. And those videos are used in ESLinsider’s courses.

Take a look.

ESLinsider's Youtube stats

Here’s a comment from one of the videos:

“I’m a new teacher and these videos really saved my hide (they still do) and my students like these activities a lot. I would like to thank you…” – Luiz Felipe

A comment on the video above.

psychogemini's review of ESLinsider

Why I don’t use 3rd party review sites

The short answer is: I don’t like middlemen.

If you are searching for reviews on ESLinsider’s courses then I’ll assume that you are also checking out other companies too and you have probably been to some 3rd party review sites like:

  • gobroad.com
  • teflcoursereview.com
  • gooverseas.com

They make money by referral links and from advertising from the courses on their site.

You have to create an account there before people can leave reviews on your course.

I did initially create an account with either the goabroad or the gooverseas site (can’t remember which one as they look the same to me) a few years ago, but changed my mind and had it deleted for a few different reasons.

If I wanted a better position on their site and to be found there then I had to pay money.

Those sites are not “unbiased” like some say.

So I decided to put the review software on my own site instead.

I don’t do affiliate marketing

Unlike most other TEFL courses, ESLinsider doesn’t have an affiliate program. Maybe I could make more money doing that, but I just don’t like it.

I don’t know about you, but to me it’s not very genuine. It’s basically like bribing people to write a review of you or link to your course.

Accreditation is another 3rd party

Accreditation in TEFL is also basically a paid review.

You may think accreditation is a sign of quality, but is it?

  1. It’s easy to fake or it’s paid for in TEFL.
  2. It’s seeks to maintain the status quo on “standards”.

And…

The question nobody seems to ask…

What do you know about the accreditor?

The idea behind accreditation might be good, but some say it doesn’t work.

I have taken two different TESOL/TEFL courses and both were accredited, but neither one was very helpful or practical.

And that’s the problem with “education”.

Accreditation isn’t about learning.

How many classes did you take in high school and college that were useless? I don’t know about you, but I don’t remember anything from geometry, chemistry, biology, history classes, etc.

I have read that many of the reviews written online are fake (Amazon is said to have 200,000,000+ fake reviews) and I wouldn’t be surprised if there are plenty of fake reviews in the TEFL course world too.

I know there are some out there.

ESLinsider is small and more like a mom and pop shop

I try to be transparent vs. not.

I didn’t originally design ESLinsider to be a course.

I didn’t like the TEFL/TESOL course industry because of all the lies. The courses came later. It’s more popular as a resource (its videos) for current teachers.

I have no interest in being another look alike TEFL course. Are all the courses out there starting to look and sound the same to you?

I wrote a bit about TEFL copycats in this PDF.

I have taken some atypical stances not trying to fit in with what I don’t believe in. For example, accreditation and TEFL course “hours“. When it comes to online courses those hours mean nothing.

I completed a so called “120 hour” online TEFL course on Groupon in 8 hours, not cause I needed it, but because I wanted to see what I would get.

Until about 2016-17 I did name my courses with “hours”, but it never sat well with my conscience and then as the course developed more I changed it…

george's review of eslinsider

George has left a few reviews his first one was left 4 years ago.

120 hour course->Advanced->TEKA

Also…

I don’t follow “best business practices” in some sense and I do criticize the TEFL course industry (some of my so-called competitors),  because this is ESLinsider not blue pill TEFL.

So…

I try to keep it simple and practical minus the hype and lies.

It’s not popular maybe because I didn’t do what other people did, but on the plus side I think you’ll find it to be more personable.

And one of my favorite quotes by Seth Godin was…

Regardless of how you measure ‘best’ (elegance, deluxeness, impact, profitability, ROI, meaningfulness, memorability), it’s almost never present in the thing that is the most popular.

All the reviews that are written on my site are written by people who have taken courses there. I also kept some testimonials (2012-2016) which started long before I set up the reviews on my site in 2016.

As of right now there are 30 (5 star) reviews on ESLinsider and 1 with just a 4 star rating, but no written review. I ask people if they can leave a review when they finish the course, however they aren’t obligated to.

There I do say that I may delete a review if they don’t use their name and email used in the course.

Why?

I say that to prevent possible trolls or evil competitors from writing a malicious fake review like some of the people below did.

Does ESLinsider have any bad reviews?

Well, to be honest there are a few that were written by people who used troll accounts.

They didn’t take a course with ESLinsider although one of them claimed to.

One troll claimed that I was selling diplomas, perhaps he saw this drawing I did and believed it.

Duh…

But if you search Google for the keywords “ESLinsider diploma” you won’t find any place where you can buy a diploma on my site.

If you search:

eslinsider reviews

You’ll see some negative pages that were written by the people below.

See the site “Eslinsiderreviews.com”?

A troll competitor whose affiliate marketing I pointed out in a review really hated me and created the site “Eslinsiderreviews.com” and called ESLinsider a “spam machine” and that I “smeared” competitors.

I later figured out who wrote that.

I wouldn’t say that I “smeared” any competitor. “Best business practice” is to not talk about your “competitors”.

But I think “best practices” are stupid.

And I just got tired of turning my cheek while these weak trolls try to destroy my work.

I just told the truth.

Am I biased?

Yeah, everyone is.

But there is a difference between a bias and a lie. Every review that you will read was written by a biased human.

There is no such thing as an “unbiased” review.

Sure, some people are more objective than others, but we all have certain tastes and preferences for certain things.

And most of the articles of reviews of other courses that I wrote on my site aren’t actually my reviews, but quotes from other people that I took off of Youtube, Reddit and other sites where I added my own comments.

I criticized the TEFL industry then for its lies and still do.

I just tell it as I see it because I feel like someone needs to tell the truth.

He also said something about a “free course scam”. I used to have a free course from about 2012 to 2016, but that was discontinued and that was mentioned in a blog post called, “Free TEFL is dead”.

He also said I did affiliate marketing referring to an old article and interview with Alex Case. You can see the link in that article is not an affiliate link and you can go ask Alex Case that.

He also criticized my “qualifications” or lack of them. True, I am not a “licensed teacher”, but I did graduate from Northern Arizona University.

I have done 2 different TEFL/TESOL courses, but I don’t put that info in my blog because I think it’s irrelevant because they are just superficial qualifications.

You are not a resume.

Then…

If you look in the search results for…

eslinsider reviews

You’ll find…

“Trusted” TEFL reviews

There’s this other newer site out there that claims to be “trusted” who wrote a fake review of my site and attacked me on Quora, TEFL.net, etc.. His sites are called trusted TEFL reviews and TEFL online pro (the winner of some award on that “trusted” site).

Here’s a comment from the video above.

bezzerb's review of ESLinsider

Aside from that…

Any critical reviews?

Like not from trolls???

Yeah, 1,000 dislikes on the videos in the pic above which is like 11% of the people who watched my videos and pushed either the like or dislike button.

And here’s a critical email I got once about the course:

“I understand the level of difficulty between the courses. However, in the 20 hour course, when answering the questions, the answer could be easily seen in the text that was meant to be studied.

I would suggest more of a challenge where studying the context is mandatory to correctly answering the question. Not just searching for the match to the question.
That is my personal opinion. Other then that, the material was well put. Thank you.” –
Sarah Gilbertson

My thoughts on that are why should I make it intentionally more difficult to learn? I try to make it easy not hard. Some teachers make you want to work for no good reason.

Not me.

I intentionally broke up all of the text into mostly small bits because that’s a better way to learn AND I put the answer right there as I didn’t think hiding the answer would help.

Listen to Seth Godin’s comment.

“Open book open note ALL THE TIME. There is zero value in memorizing anything ever again. Anything worth memorizing is worth looking up.” – Seth Godin

ginatare's review of ESLinsider


“Not Well-Known, Yet Has Invaluable Information and Advice From a Great Teacher…

At first I was hesitant to take Ian’s Advanced Course, since there didn’t seem to be much information about it online. However, I can now say with full confidence that Ian has put together a masterclass catalog of teaching materials, each presented in a clear and logical way, with a great website to re-find anything if needed. The course pages seem to be frequently updated and Ian is incredibly quick to respond to submitted assignments or messages.

Direct communication with Ian is a huge plus. There are a few assignments to submit (Lesson Plans, mainly) and Ian gave me very detailed and meaningful feedback on every one. – Kyle P.

Read more reviews of ESLinsider’s online TEFL courses or ask me a question.

Last words…

Your reading this on my personal blog, but you can also learn more about ESLinsider here.

Also there are some reviews on a guide book that I wrote on Amazon and other related posts below: