Fix your flat feet to improve your knees, posture, etc.

I went walking today at low tide on the sand and after I looked at my foot steps. They were rather duck footed (more than I remembered).

So I googled:

how to fix duck feet

The guy said they can be caused by flat feet or tight hips/glutes. One of my feet is flatter than the other and I’ve noticed lately over the last few years that my hips and pelvis area has become more creaky, tight or sore especially when I roll on them.

This is the first video I watched on DUCK FEET:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8CwSuEfzZOk

Then I saw another video and one guy said flat feet can cause KNEE injuries, other problems and possibly KYPHOSIS.

How to fix FLAT FEET (if you have flat feet you probably want to watch it!)

Been rollin on my feet with my tennis ball in a sock and aluminum water bottle (works good for massage).

I realized…

My feet are a neglected part in my workout especially considering it’s a weakness. I’ve had quite a few knee injuries.

I need to work on them more.

Ian’s upgrading his workout!

Need to level up my feet.

For a long time I’ve done squats for my leg workout, but they don’t do much for your feet. Lately I’ve been doing box jumps where I’ll jump up on a bench or some platform 1-2 feet tall and then step down. Then do that 40-50 times.

It’s pretty good.

It will work your glutes, quads, hamstrings, calves and maybe feet a little. I like them better than squats as squats hurt one of my knees (not the more recently injured one though).

It hurts the one that also has a tight sore hip.

So got to fix that hip and THOSE FEET.

MASSAGE.

And as I am writing this I am standing on my tennis ball.

It’s really good for foot massage actually. If you put it in a sock it won’t roll away.

It’s kind of interesting how your feet (foundation) can affect your whole body. I used to wear orthotics as a kid, but those don’t work.

I need to strengthen my foot.

Also the flatter foot my right one is more difficult to balance on like mentioned in the video.

Back in high school basketball I used to do a lot of toe raises. And probably had stronger feet then.

Considering this fact that the foot is the most distal part of the lower extremity and acts as a support point through which the body maintains its balance, even minimal biomechanical changes at the support level can affect postural control strategies. If a change occurs in foot alignment, the pelvis changes its position in order to maintain the body’s center of gravity.

Flat feet/kyphosis study:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4825482/

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